Plywood: Material of the Modern World – Scrapbook

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As the German guard said in Die Hard 3 ‘It’s raining dogs and cats today’. And it sure was. The missus and I planned a trip to Kew Gardens this weekend but the dog-sh*t British weather meant we had to improvise and instead, killed a couple of hours in the V&A Museum.


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We caught two exhibitions, one on the history of Plywood and the Balenciaga exhibition which you’ll need to shell out 12 sheets for.


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Plywood has been used in Engineering since the 1860’s. It’s often stronger, lighter and more elastic than metal.


Plywood has been around for donkeys. It’s typically made from Cedar or Douglas Fir, it’s chopped, stripped, dunked in water to soften and then attached to a spindle where it is shaved of all its bark, before being stripped into thin layers. These layers can later be compressed to other veneers, glued, heated and finally moulded.


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Lighting was dim, tough to get decent crisp shots without a flash which wasn’t allowed.


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It’s strong, versatile, supple and makes a mean monkfish stew. Wait, sorry I’m describing my missus. Boom-tish. (I have better jokes).


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